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Anthony Cirillo

Is Sedentary Lifestyle a Medical Condition?

By December 26, 2012

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A sedentary lifestyle is a common cause of obesity, and excessive body weight and fat in turn are considered catalysts for diabetes, high blood pressure, joint damage and other serious health problems. But should lack of exercise itself be treated as a medical condition? Mayo Clinic physiologist Michael Joyner, M.D., argues that it should be.

Physical inactivity affects the health not only of many obese patients, but also people of normal weight, such as workers with desk jobs, patients immobilized for long periods after injuries or surgery, and women on extended bed rest during pregnancies, among others, Dr. Joyner says.

Prolonged lack of exercise can cause the body to become deconditioned, with wide-ranging structural and metabolic changes: the heart rate may rise excessively during physical activity, bones and muscles atrophy, physical endurance wane, and blood volume decline. When deconditioned people try to exercise, they may tire quickly and experience dizziness or other discomfort, then give up trying to exercise and find the problem gets worse rather than better.

"I would argue that physical inactivity is the root cause of many of the common problems that we have," Dr. Joyner says. "If we were to medicalize it, we could then develop a way, just like we've done for addiction, cigarettes and other things, to give people treatments, and lifelong treatments, that focus on behavioral modifications and physical activity."

Several chronic medical conditions are associated with poor capacity to exercise. Too often, medication rather than progressive exercise is prescribed, Dr. Joyner says.

If physical inactivity were treated as a medical condition itself rather than simply a cause or byproduct of other medical conditions, physicians may become more aware of the value of prescribing supported exercise, and more formal rehabilitation programs that include cognitive and behavioral therapy would develop, Dr. Joyner says.

For those who have been sedentary and are trying to get into exercise, Dr. Joyner advises doing it slowly and progressively.

"You just don't jump right back into it and try to train for a marathon," he says. "Start off with achievable goals and do it in small bites."

There's no need to join a gym or get a personal trainer: build as much activity as possible into daily life. Even walking just 10 minutes three times a day can go a long way toward working up to the 150 minutes a week of moderate physical activity the typical adult needs, Dr. Joyner says.

Of course, this has several implications. Most of our aging service providers have front line staff that are on the go all the time so their physical activity is somewhat accounted for though it does not necessarily mean they are healthy. But for administrators and other office workers, how do you stay active on the job? Do you take a walk at lunch? Do you have one of those desks where you can stand and work? Do you give employees options for trying to stay active while at work?

And of course for residents, is an active lifestyle promoted? Is it designed in your activity program? Is it accounted for in the resident assessment?

With the beginning of penalties for readmissions for hospitals, providers should use every means to keep their population of employees and residents healthy. What are you doing in this regard?

Source: Mayo Clinic

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Comments

May 24, 2013 at 9:43 pm
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